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Take Back the Night

Take Back the Night

The Baxter is a community center that hosts more than 100 events each year from weddings and holiday parties to conferences and fundraisers. Take Back the Night back is one of the many events that The Baxter is proud to collaborate on with local and non-profit organizations in Bozeman, including Montana State University, Students Against Sexual Assault, Not in Our House and the Help Center’s Sexual Assault Counseling Center. Take Back the Night is a week-long series of events held every year to protest violence, particularly sexual violence, against women. The events provide an opportunity for both men and women to come together to take a stand against violence and provide those who have been impacted with an opportunity to speak out and heal. Jack, a long-standing staff member of The Baxter, remembers participating in the Take Back the Night march in the spring of 2009 as a student attending MSU. The evening began with a rally on the steps of the Strand Union Building (SUB) at MSU. Chicks with Sticks, Bozeman’s premier bucket band, lead everyone in the march from the SUB to The Baxter. Chicks with Sticks celebrate’s life’s diversity in its many forms, and is known in the Bozeman community for being active in supporting gay and lesbian issues, women’s empowerment and other social justice work. “There was a mass of people, mostly MSU students, marching with the Montana Women’s Chorus and Chicks with Sticks down Main Street,” Jack recalls, “We walked all the way from the SUB to The Baxter where there was a Rock Against Rape Concert in the Ballroom.” Jack distinctly remembers the concert that night...
Bozeman Daily Chronicle: ‘Hotel Baxter’ Sign Shines Again

Bozeman Daily Chronicle: ‘Hotel Baxter’ Sign Shines Again

Snow drifted down on the crowd as the historic “Hotel Baxter” sign was relit Thursday night, once again glowing above the downtown sky. “A crown jewel of Bozeman,” U.S. Senator Max Baucus told people gathered outside at the corner of Main Street and Grand Avenue just before the sign was turned on. Exceptfor a few test runs, the 32-foot high and 45-foot wide electric sign has stood dark for decades atop downtown’s tallest building. The sign was erected in 1929 on the roof of the seven-story Baxter Hotel, on the corner of Main Street and Willson Avenue. The sign’s builder, August H. Lake, intended it to be seen from as far as Butte. “It is not claimed that the letters can be distinguished for such great distances, but the reflection of the electric light in the sky from the sign will be intense enough to be easily located and thereby serve as a beacon for travelers as far away as the Butte hill in the west,” stated an article published in the Chronicle when the hotel opened. “One will also be able to see the glow in the sky from all highways entering Bozeman for great distances.” The sign has been sanded and repainted black and yellow, colors believed to be original. At Thursday night’s relighting ceremony, speakers included majority owner of the Baxter David Loseff, Sen. Baucus and Deputy Mayor Jeff Krauss. Baucus announced that he and his wife Mel are moving to Bozeman from Helena. “We’ll start building pretty soon,” he said. As the red, neon “Hotel Baxter” sign lit up the cold evening, the blue light,...
Bozeman Magazine: The History of the Baxter Hotel

Bozeman Magazine: The History of the Baxter Hotel

Back in the 1920s, in the days before commercial airports, interstate highways, and chain motels, travelers arriving in a city always headed downtown to find a good meal and a good place to stay. Every town worth its measure had a downtown hotel or two, and a good one was a source of immense pride to the community. Not only did a landmark hotel attract visitors and business, it became a center for the town itself, a community gathering place and a home for civic events. Bozeman’s Baxter Hotel was designed to serve just such a role, and it has done so not for the better part of a century, the social and architectural focal point of the city’s downtown. The origins of the Baxter date to the mid-1920s, an era when Bozeman was still a mid-sized farm town, roughly the same size as Livingston and thoroughly overshadowed by the urban metropolis of Butte. Back then, the city’s primary hostelry was the Bozeman Hotel, an imposing, rambling structure that dated from the 1890s. Though it was still the largest building on Main Street three decades later, the Bozeman was beginning to seem faded and out-of-date in the faster-moving twentieth century. The city’s civic and business leaders felt this keenly, and worried that the lack of an up-to-date hotel would make it harder for Bozeman to grow. The town needed a new, modern hotel. Their goal in mind, Bozeman’s leading citizens set to work. In 1927, a group of sixteen prominent Bozemanites, led by Eugene Graf, gathered to form the Bozeman Community Hotel Corporation, which would build the new hotel....
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